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Difference between forceps delivery and vacuum delivery

The Pros and Cons of a Forceps vs

Using a vacuum can increase the risk of certain complications such as retinal hemorrhage and cephalhematoma (excess blood between skull and tissue of the child's head). If a vacuum delivery fails, there is a higher chance that a C-section will have to take place which also increases risks of complications. Forceps Delivery Forceps and vacuum deliveries are rare - just 3 percent of vaginal births. In these deliveries, your healthcare practitioner uses either a vacuum device or forceps to help your baby out of the birth canal. These procedures are often used to help prevent a c-section. In experienced hands, assisted delivery is generally considered safe for moms. Forceps or vacuum delivery. Assisted delivery. An assisted birth (also known as an instrumental delivery) is when forceps or a ventouse suction cup are used to help deliver the baby. Ventouse and forceps are safe and only used when necessary for you and your baby. Assisted delivery is less common in women who've had a spontaneous vaginal birth. Forceps and vacuum extraction function in much the same way: they both guide the baby out of the birth canal during delivery. We do not really pull the baby out, but help direct the baby while you push - we still need your help My preference now is using a vacuum cup. If using forceps which type of forceps are chosen is determined by which way the baby's head is turned. Forceps are of different shape to suit the position to the baby's head. Using the wrong forceps increases the difficulty and risks of the operative vaginal delivery considerably

Forceps delivery and vacuum delivery BabyCente

Assisted Birth: Forceps or Vacuum Delivery. Assisted vaginal birth refers to the use of a specially designed instrument to help with delivery during the last part of labor. It is also referred to. Forceps delivery uses forceps, similar to oversized salad tongs, to help guide the baby out of the birth canal. The vacuum delivery uses a vacuum. In a forceps delivery, half of the forceps is gently slid onto one side of the baby's head. The other is gently slid on the other side so it cradles his or her face

study carried out in Nishtar Hospital showed that there was no marked difference between forceps and vacuum delivery regarding maternal and fetal morbidity7 sequential use of vacuum and forceps is associated with increased risk of both neonatal and maternal injury8 The decision-to-delivery interval was compared between forceps delivery and vacuum extraction. Results: The decision-to-delivery interval was 8.6±5.4 and 13.8±6.2 min for forceps and vacuum deliveries, respectively (P=0.0001). Conclusion: It appears that it is quicker to accomplish forceps delivery than vacuum extraction Forceps was associated with significantly more POP, levator avulsion and larger hiatal areas than were vacuum and normal vaginal deliveries. There were no statistically significant differences between vacuum and normal vaginal deliveries

significant difference was found in apgar score at 5 min in forceps and vacuum deliveries. This is comparable to a local study conducted at Nishter Medical Hospital Multan i n whic h the re was no m arked dif fer ence in apgar score at 1 and 5 min between forceps and vacuum de liveries12 . Si mi lar ly Cochr ane s ys tem ati c r evi ew of ni n Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective review on instrumental vaginal deliveries (vacuum extraction and forceps delivery) carried out between 1 st January 2011 and 31 st December 2014. The hospital records of all the patients who had vacuum or forceps delivery were obtained and data on age, parity, booking status, and type of procedure. However the vacuum delivery is safer to the mother but may cause some injuries to baby. Forceps delivery and vacuum delivery are called assisted vaginal delivery. The delivery occurred through the vagina with the pulling force of the instruments. This will help to reduce the mother's exertion Use of forceps is more likely to result in a vaginal delivery than use of vacuum devices (relative risk [RR] = 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1 to 2.2), but has a higher rate of perineal. Forceps and ventouse (or the vacuum method), are used to vaginally deliver babies more rapidly, when a woman is experiencing complications, or slow progress in the second stage of labour (or even towards the end of the first stage with the ventouse). Both these methods essentially perform the same task in different ways

Bahl et al., in a prospective cohort study of 381 women who underwent a mid-cavity rotational delivery in two UK hospitals (2004-2006), found that there was no difference in OASIS between rotational forceps delivery (Kielland forceps), manual rotation followed by nonrotational forceps delivery and rotational vacuum delivery used to asses any difference between the two groups with reference to the instrument used. The P value to be significant will be taken as equal to or less than 0.05. Comparison of Neonatal and Maternal Outcome between Forceps and Vacuum Delivery 766 P J M H S VOL .5 NO.4 OCT - DEC 2011 Table 1: Distribution of Mothers according to their ag Vacuum-assisted vaginal birth is more often associated with shoulder dystocia and cephalohematoma. Forceps delivery is more often associated with third- and fourth-degree perineal lacerations. These differences in complications rates should be considered among other factors when determining the optimal mode of delivery. II-2 Similarly, there was no statistical difference in the mean APGAR scores at 5 min between those babies delivered by vacuum (mean = 7.4 ± 2.4) and those delivered by forceps (mean = 7.2 ± 2.2) (t = 0.86, df = 516, P = 0.38). Figure 1: Apgar at 1 st min for babies delivered by vacuum and forceps Click here to vie

No differences were found between vacuum and normal vaginal delivery. Conclusions We found that mode of delivery was associated with POP and pelvic floor muscle trauma in women from a general population, 16-24years after their first delivery. Forceps was associated with significantly more POP, levator avulsion and larger hiatal areas tha delivery with increased risk of prolapse and incontinence symptoms. There was no difference between forceps and vacuum delivery. Paper II: Cesarean delivery had decreased risk for prolapse stage 2 or surgery and for levator avulsion, and smaller hiatal areas compared to normal delivery. Forceps ha

Forceps or vacuum delivery - NH

What moms should know about forceps and vacuum deliveries

The decision-to-delivery interval was compared between forceps delivery and vacuum extraction. RESULTS: The decision-to-delivery interval was 8.6+/-5.4 and 13.8+/-6.2 min for forceps and vacuum deliveries, respectively (P=0.0001). CONCLUSION: It appears that it is quicker to accomplish forceps delivery than vacuum extraction. PMID: 1640818 OBJECTIVE: To compare perinatal outcomes between forceps- and vacuum-assisted deliveries. Our hypothesis was that the force vectors achieved in forceps delivery will lead to fewer shoulder dystocias, but greater perineal lacerations. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of 4,120 term, cephalic, singleton, nonrotational operative vaginal deliveries at a single institution Overview. A forceps delivery is a type of assisted vaginal delivery. It's sometimes needed in the course of vaginal childbirth. In a forceps delivery, a health care provider applies forceps — an instrument shaped like a pair of large spoons or salad tongs — to the baby's head to help guide the baby out of the birth canal Two trials involving 128 women compared forceps/vacuum with manual delivery without any significance difference in outcomes. There is also insufficient evidence to support the use of medication to relax the uterus (tocolysis) at the time of a caesarean to assist with safe delivery of the baby, with only one trial involving 97 women addressing. Interesting. I have a 9 1/2 week old daughter. Spontaneous labour normal delivery and forceps attempted but labour stopped progressing and she was getting distressed so born by emergency c-section. I had no time to bond with her due to me being out of it on meds and her being taken for tests due to not being able to keep her milk down

Risk factors for obstetrical brachial plexus palsy

Vacuums and Forceps in Delivery Obstetric Excellence Norwes

  1. Dall'Asta (2016), on the other hand, showed no difference in the rate of shoulder dystocia between the use of vacuum and forceps. He postulated that the use of the vacuum or forceps to expedite fetal head delivery may interfere with the spontaneous mechanism of rotation of the trunk and ultimately with the descent of the shoulders in the.
  2. OBJECTIVE: To compare perinatal outcomes between forceps- and vacuum-assisted deliveries. Our hypothesis was that the force vectors achieved in forceps delivery will lead to fewer shoulder dystocias, but greater perineal lacerations. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of 4,120 term, cephalic, singleton, nonrotational operative.
  3. Delivery by vacuum extraction is at least as safe as delivery by forceps. Fatal complications and outcomes (neonatal death and intracranial haemorrhage) were similar between neonates and infants from two large birth cohorts in the United States after delivery by forceps or vacuum extraction
  4. utes and few serious injuries in neonates, although the vacuum extractor was associated with an increase in cephalohaematoma and retinal haemorrhage.14 Evidence addressing long term outcomes is.
  5. A new study shows that forceps deliveries are causing increasing trauma to moms and babies in Canada. The use of forceps during delivery is highly controversial, and many experts and researchers have warned that doctors are not properly trained to use the tools in a way that reduces the risk of injury. Continued efforts to reduce the number of Cesarean section (c-section) deliveries may have.
  6. In a randomized controlled trial comparing maternal outcomes after forceps versus vacuum delivery, no difference was noted between forceps and vacuum delivery groups in terms of various urinary and bowel symptoms at 5 years postpartum

Forceps Delivery and Vacuum Extraction GLOW

There were no differences between forceps and vacuum devices in Apgar score, shoulder dystocia, need for intubation, severe morbidity, death, or use of maternal analgesia. Compared with soft-cup vacuum devices, use of metal cups was more likely to result in a vaginal delivery but had higher rates of neonatal bruising, cephalohematoma, and scalp. Two recent papers have examined the difference in effect between emergency and elective CS on asthma outcomes (11, 12). Some have also examined the association between instrumental delivery (forceps and vacuum extraction) and the risk of asthma and allergy (13-15). The choice of birth mode of delivery is made based on maternal characteristics an infants delivered following forceps or vacuum delivery had depressed 5-min Apgar scores. Fetal birth weights The birth weights of infants ranged between 1.5 and 4.0 kg. Operative vaginal deliveries were mostly performed among infants weighing 2.52-3.99 kg. Forceps delivery was most frequently performed in low birth weight infants (59.6%.

The association between mode of delivery and subsequent asthma or atopy and its possible mechanisms has recently been studied in a large data set where vaginal delivery (VD) was analysed separate from vaginal instrumental delivery (forceps and vacuum extraction), CS subdivided into emergency CS and elective CS and unmeasured familial. Types of Forceps. There are many situations in which the use of obstetric forceps may help delivery. As a result, there are over 600 different types of forceps, of which maybe 15 to 20 are. The association between forceps delivery These findings support our hypothesis that a difficult and asthma at age 13 remained statistically significant childbirth requiring forceps assistance is associated with in the multivariate analysis (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.06- development of asthma and atopy, but that these asso- 3.08), but the association.

Objective: To determine the incidence and indications of instrumental vaginal delivery and to compare the foetal and maternal outcome of vacuum and forceps deliveries. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study on instrumental vaginal deliveries carried out between June 2009 and May 2011. The hospital records of all the patients who. Methods and materials: A total of 100 patients were retrospectively analysed to compare the outcome between forceps (N=50) and vacuum application(N=50) between January 2015 to December 2015 in a tertiary care hospital. The indications for instrumental delivery were fetal distress, failure of descent of head, to cut shor The only statistically significant difference between the two vaginal delivery groups was in history of anal sphincter laceration which was more common among women in the forceps assisted delivery group compared to women in the vacuum delivery group (57% vs. 19%, p=0.002) If physicians can learn to recognize when to use forceps versus when to use vacuum extractors versus when to switch gears in a delivery and delivery a baby through C-section. And if physicians can recognize which of these alternatives has the right balance of benefits and risks under a wide range of scenarios O perative or assisted vaginal delivery (OVD) is a vaginal birth in which an instrument is needed to facilitate the delivery and is accomplished using a vacuum device or forceps. 1 Over 700 different types of obstetrical forceps have been known so far in history. 2 Both vacuum and forceps deliveries require a skilled and experienced obstetrician.. There are various types of vacuums available

Materials and Methods. This was a retrospective study on instrumental vaginal deliveries carried out between June 2009 and May 2011. The hospital records of all the patients who had had vacuum or forceps delivery were obtained and data on age, parity, booking status, and type of procedure performed, APGAR scores of babies delivered and complications were entered into a proforma and analyzed. Forceps can be used to touch sterile bandaging when a physician cannot touch it. Forceps can also hold onto small pieces of tissue during surgeries or in areas where the fingers cannot reach or fit. Specialized forceps assist in the vaginal delivery of infants. Intestinal forceps have a very long and narrow tip

Delivery by vacuum extraction is at least as safe as delivery by forceps. Fatal complications and outcomes (neonatal death and intracranial haemorrhage) were similar between neonates and infants from two large birth cohorts in the United States after delivery by for ceps or vacuum extraction. The risk of birth injuries OBJECTIVES: To study possible associations between mode of delivery and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and pelvic floor muscle trauma 16-24 years after first delivery and, in particular, to identify differences between forceps and vacuum delivery NO long-term differences in cognitive/neurologic dev't between operative delivery & SVD c-sections still have inc rate of complications, blood loss, & length of stay a trial of forceps/vacuum at +2 station or greater results in less neonatal morbidity compared to C-section from low statio

Long-term effects of vacuum and forceps deliverie

  1. A randomised prospective study comparing the new vacuum results in cup detachment. We estimated the volume of extractor policy with forceps delivery. Br J Obstet Gynecol 1993; vacuum of the Kiwi Omnicup as 9 ml, which compared with 100:524-30. 350 ml for a conventional vacuum device
  2. (12) In selected cases, fine needle biopsy appears to be preferable to transbronchial forceps biopsy since the risk of a possibly life-threatening pulmonary hemorrhage may be lower. (13) Corneal abrasion occurred in two babies and corneal oedema in one baby after forceps delivery but in none of the control group
  3. a ratio of ventouse to forceps of 2.1:1 compared with the reverse only a few years previously.8 More recently, a 5-year follow up from one of the above cohorts demonstrated no significant differences between forceps and ventouse in terms of longer term maternal or child health.9 The problem of failure to achieve delivery therefore becomes more.
  4. Abstract Objective To study the association between pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) and mode of delivery and to calculate the risks of PFD comparing caesarean delivery and operative vaginal delivery to normal vaginal delivery 15-23 years after childbirth. A subgroup analysis comparing forceps and vacuum delivery was planned
  5. Result There were significant differences in the incidence of levator ani avulsion between forceps and vacuum extraction deliveries (p<0,05). Avulsion of the levator ani muscles occurred in 8 patients (47,1%) with forceps extraction, and 2 patients (11,8%) in the vacuum extraction
  6. Pre-delivery SUI, UUI and FI were 9.7, 9.7 and 3.1% respectively. The overall prevalence of 8 weeks post instrumental delivery SUI, UUI and FI were increased to 11.8, 21.5 and 7.6% respectively (Table 2). There is no statistical difference between forceps and vacuum delivery sub-groups. Interpretation of result

Forceps and Vaccu

low instrumental delivery is common 208 (58.3%) followed by out let and mid pelvis instrumental deliveries, 28.6% and 13.2% respectively. Fetal distress was the most common indication, 160 (44.3%) and Forceps assisted vaginal delivery was also frequently used instrumental delivery, 197 (55.2%) than vacuum. Feto-maternal complication The choice between forceps and vacuum is hotly debated in the obstetrical community. Many studies show that they have equal rates of injuries. However, a vacuum likely has a higher rate of cephalohematoma and shoulder dystocia , while forceps use leads to a higher rate of facial nerve palsies and maternal injuries Discussion. This is the first report concerning the introduction of forceps delivery to clinical practice, which might be necessary for vaginal delivery in order to comply with the new restrictions on the number of tractions with vacuum delivery. 4) We introduced an education program for residents covering forceps delivery. Then we evaluated maternal and neonatal outcomes following deliveries. forceps or vacuum devices result in lower vaginal delivery than use of vacuum devices (relative risk [RR] = 1.5; 95% confidence There were no differences between forceps and vacuum devices.

Study Reveals Birth Injuries as Most Common Cause of

  1. Apr 5, 2021 at 6:14 PM. I wouldn't worry about that too much!! It seems like forceps & vacuum deliveries are rare and only used in emergency situations. If baby isn't progressing down the birth canal, there are much safer solutions like changing your pushing position (e.g. hands & knees, squatting)
  2. 6. Do your database allow you to distinguish between forceps and vacuum deliveries? If so, please split instrumental delivery into vacuum and forceps? 7. In table 4 and 5: Type of delivery should be divided into: non-instrumental vertex vaginal delivery, breech delivery, forceps delivery and vacuum delivery. Breech deliveries are included in you
  3. Results: High Statistically significant difference in pain score during delivery of head in favor of forceps group (P = 0.001). No differences were found among 3 groups as regarding pain expectation, uterine extension, uterine vessel injury and in need of haemostatic stitches (P > 0.05)
  4. ent fetal distress might result in a different quality of vaginal operative delivery than prolonged second stage. Kearny et al. showed a significant association between major levator ani defects and the use of forceps
  5. To define predictors of successful rotation and rate of caesarean delivery after manual rotation of the foetal occiput from occiput posterior or transverse position.. Retrospective. Other. How Can Manual Rotation Reduce Vacuum, Forceps and Caesarean Deliveries?—A Review of the Evidence . #literature review. 18 0
  6. Umbilical artery and vein acid-base status should be routinely recorded immediately after delivery. The choice is between forceps and the ventouse. Forceps delivery. There are three main types of obstetric forceps (Fig. 47.1)

Forceps Compared With Vacuum: Rates of Neonatal and

Facial abrasion caused by the equipment was significantly more frequent in forceps deliveries (6/46, 13.0%) vs. vacuum deliveries (1/62, 1.6%). Similar results were found between all cases and cases delivered by trainees. Conclusion: Forceps delivery was introduced as a clinical practice that is as safe as vacuum delivery. It is conceivable. The other option is the use of vacuum extraction. Vacuums used have a cup on the end and are inserted into the cervix. The cup attaches to the fetus's head by suction and aids in guiding delivery. The choice between forceps and vacuum extraction is usually made by the doctor based on preference

Forcep- and vacuum-assisted deliveries were both associated with maternal and newborn complications. There was no significant difference in the use of anesthesia between forceps and vacuum deliveries. Conclusion : Operative vaginal delivery rates in this center are comparable to other centers as are the possible complications There is a very strong connection between forceps delivery and perineal trauma. (Read Assisted Delivery vs C Section to learn more about forceps delivery, also known as an operative or assisted delivery.) Women who have an assisted or operative vaginal birth are 3.5 times more likely to experience severe perineal tears than women give. Additionally, forceps or vacuum delivery generally should not be used electively until the criteria for an outlet delivery have been met. In these circumstances, operative vaginal delivery is a simple and safe operation, although with some risk of maternal lower reproductive tract injury (Yancey, 1991) The decision-to-delivery interval was compared between forceps delivery and vacuum extraction. The decision-to-delivery interval was 8.6+/-5.4 and 13.8+/-6.2 min for forceps and vacuum deliveries, respectively (P=0.0001). It appears that it is quicker to accomplish forceps delivery than vacuum extraction Our aim was to describe the range of perineal trauma in women with a singleton vaginal birth and estimate the effect of maternal and obstetric characteristics on the incidence of perineal tears. We conducted a prospective observational study on all women with a planned singleton vaginal delivery between May and September 2006 in one obstetric unit, three freestanding midwifery-led units and.

CONCLUSION Vacuum-assisted vaginal birth is more often associated with shoulder dystocia and cephalohematoma. Forceps delivery is more often associated with third- and fourth-degree perineal lacerations. These differences in complications rates should be considered among other factors when determining the optimal mode of delivery difference in long term follow up between forceps and ventouse delivery - RCOG green top guidelines 1999. • Pudendal nerve damage can be cumulative. Delivery in 2nd Stage by C. section does not prevent this . Mac arthur et al BJOG - 1997. • It has been shown that ultrasonographically visible anal sphincte We typically don't do it before 34 weeks, especially for a vacuum delivery. Some people may do a forceps delivery a little bit earlier, earlier than 34 weeks. So before 34 weeks we don't do an operative vaginal delivery, just because their little bodies are a bit more fragile. And there's a little bit of trauma. I hate to say trauma. I don't know

Assisted Birth: Forceps or Vacuum Deliver

Forceps Injuries During a long and difficult labor and delivery, doctors may use a number of different techniques to assist the baby out of the birth canal. In some cases, where the baby is stuck, doctors may decide to utilize birth-assistive tools such as forceps to help free the baby. In a forceps delivery, an Continue reading Forceps Injurie Objective: The fundal pressure exerted by the assistant to deliver fetal head is often painful to the patient. This study assesses the use of double blade forceps in delivery of fetal head at time of elective Cesarean Section (CS). Methods: A prospective single-blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted among 150 women with repeat elective CS at Ain Shams university hospital, Air Force. Vacuum extractor is less likely to achieve a successful vaginal delivery and to cause serious maternal injury than applying the forceps. Although the vacuum is associated with a greater incidence of cephalohematoma, other facial/cranial injuries are more common with forceps [7]

As nouns the difference between tweezers and forceps is that tweezers is a small pincerlike instrument, usually made of metal, used for handling or picking up small objects (such as postage stamps), plucking out]] (plucking) hairs, [[pull out|pulling out slivers, etc while forceps is (l) (instrument used in surgery to grasp objects) The difference in perinatal outcome held after controlling for the experience level of the obstetrician. No significant difference was noted in maternal mortality or serious maternal morbidity between the 2 groups within the first 6 weeks of delivery (3.9% vs 3.2%, P = .35)

Cephalohematoma Complications

Forceps may also be made from different materials, including metal and plastic. Obstetric forceps are used in childbirth, and these types of forceps are usually much larger than other types. The word forceps comes from the Latin word forca, which means trap. Many of the types of forceps are used as medical instruments The higher difference in the proportion of forceps to vacuum deliveries from other studies can be due to the commonest indication being NRFHRP which needs faster delivery and the inconsistent supply of functioning vacuum extraction devices in the study area [1, 2, 5, 11] Although most of these factors have not been studied systematically, one report suggested an association between forceps assistance, vacuum extraction, and cesarean section during labor and ICH . The investigators had limited information, however, on the indications for operative delivery and the occurrence of bleeding disorders or hypoxia. As vacuum extraction results in less maternal trauma than forceps-assisted delivery and perineal trauma also differs by type of forceps used, our inability to separate the procedures may have obscured differential intervention outcomes. 24,25 Further, the extent of perineal morbidity associated with vacuum-assisted delivery has been reported to.

What Is A Vacuum Extraction Delivery? 13 FAQs You Are Askin

  1. Upper cervical care was used for a nine-year old male with Tourette Syndrome (TS), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), depression, asthma, insomnia, and headaches since age 6. Forceps were used during his delivery. His medications included AlbuterolT, DepakoteT, WellbutrinT, and AdderallT. Chiropractic care using an upper cervical.
  2. The bipolar forceps used in this study included regular stainless steel, titanium, heat-pipe embedded, and SILVERGlide forceps. Temperature was measured by micro-thermistor at the midpoint between the bipolar tips, and 1 and 2 mm away from the midpoint along the centerline. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate temperature differences
  3. 82 <50, there was a statistically significant difference in the risk of stress urinary 83 incontinence for forceps delivery (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.09-1.86, absolute difference 84 5.0%), but not for vacuum (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.59-1.09) when compared to 85 spontaneous vaginal delivery. Among women aged <50, forceps also had increase
  4. Vacuum extraction is more common than forceps delivery, but indications and risks are the same. Soft, sylastic cups are attached to the posterior fontanelle to deliver the head. Nurses obtain informed consent, provide analgesia, assist the physician, and provide patient education
  5. Risks of forceps delivery The NHS states that risks of forceps deliveries include: temporary marks on baby's face. small cuts or bruises on baby's face. a bruise on baby's head (known as 'cephalohaematoma') which may increase the baby's risk of developing jaundice
  6. In operative vaginal delivery, the rate of forceps delivery has decreased more than that of vacuum extraction [5]. In Japanese high-level medical facilities, the rates of cesarean, vacuum, and forceps delivery are 20%, 6%, and 1%, respectively, among all deliveries except for planned cesarean deliveries [ 4 ]
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  1. November 8, 2014 ~ tstockmann. ~ Leave a comment. [Following a vaginal delivery] Some 42% of women show some symptoms of urinary incontinence, 4%-12% of women suffer from faecal incontinence. According to Thornton, If you have a forceps delivery the chance of having faecal incontinence increases to 40% or 45%
  2. ed in primigravida (Halligan et al. 1993). One concern regarding validation of automated equipment is the necessity to have an acceptable standardised protocol
  3. g surgery
  4. al ul-trasound assessment should be conducted i
  5. ent fetal compromise, to shorten the second stage of labour for maternal benefit, or for prolonged second stage of labour, especially where the fetal head is malrotated
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